Ceramics

  

 

John Maltby

John Maltby

The work and the working methods of John Maltby have greatly influenced my work. It was a plate by John bought from a gallery in St Ives which was the first real piece of ceramics i bought and is still one of my prized possessions. This was at an early age and i was fortunate to meet John on a few occasions both personally, as a student and professionally. John was a student in Leicester with my Mother studying sculpture and the sculptural aspect of Johns work is clear to see. 

 
 

John Maltby

One of the first pots i bought from the Yew Tree Gallery was a pot by Robin Welch. As a young teenager the pot fascinated me as it was very different to anything i had seen before. The clay was very rough and there were broken holes through the sides. I did spend a great deal of time trying to create my own versions of this pot with some very rough clay. My hands did take some punishment but i did learn a great deal. I have met Robin on a few occasions at Rufford and my parents have kindly purchased a few more of his pots for me over the years.    

    
 
 

Robin Welch

Robin Welch

Robin Welch

  

 

 

  

The work of Colin Pearson has been a major influence for me and anyone who knows my work will see why. I was lucky enough to meet Colin while at Farnham as he was my external examiner. I also met him many years later at Rufford and was able to buy a small piece from him

Colin Pearson

Colin Pearson

Colin Pearson

   

 

 

 

 

I worked with both Jim Malone and Mike Dodd in Cumbria in the late eighties when they were running the studio ceramics course in Carlisle. It was a very different philosophy to a way of working than i was used to but over the years Jim and his work grew on me. I gained valuable experience in the understanding of material and form which i now feel drawn to.

Jim Malone

Jim Malone

Jim Malone

 

 

 

 
 
 

Jaqueline Poncelet came to Farnham to give a lecture when i was a student  and showed some fascinating work. At the time there were a number of potters with very different ideas of the way pots should be made. Another of these potters was Carol McNicol who was very well know but i did just not relate to her work. Although Jaqueline’s work was certainly not a vessel the use of clay and glaze combinations showed, for me, a truth to the material. A number of potters at the time seemed intent in disguising what materials they were using.

 

Jaqueline Poncelet

Jaqueline Poncelet

 

 

I have to include Paul Soldner for  obvious reasons but i personally prefere his earlier work which was more about the vessell and the surface of the vessell. His later pieces are more experimental but they loose the surface qualities of the fireing technique.

 

  

Paul Soldner

  

  

 Peter Beards work i have seen at Rufford and my parents have a wall piece that i see every time i visit. For me it is the form rather than the glaze and surface which i find interesting.

 

 

 

  

Duncan Ross was our Chief Technician at Farnham and was very helpful, especially when i got my first job as a Technician in Cumbria and gave me some very valuable technical advice (including this tip; always walk around with a cup of coffee – it makes you look like you are too busy to stop and drink it – sorry Duncan!). Duncan’s skill was with the kilns and it is no surprise to see how his work has developed into these incredibly detailed pieces.

Duncan Ross

 I have bought a few earlier pieces of Carlos Versluys work which incorporated much more surface relief work. His later work to me has become a canvas and his decoration is that of a painter.

  

Carlos Versluys

Carlos Versluys
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I have to include Sebastian Blackie in my list as he clearly had a direct influence as my tutor at Farnham. It was a very influential time for me and as a practicing artist there was always Sebastian’s work around to inspire me.

Sebastian Blackie

Kevin de Choisy

  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Elizabeth Fritch is most well known for her musically inspired patterned vases. In some ways the form of the pieces was just as much an influence on me as the decoration so it was good to see later form that relied solely on form. 

Elizabeth Fritch

 One of the first inspiring pottery books i bought was called ‘Raku’ by Richard Hirsch. This seemed to open up endlass possibilities of surface techniques that i could try in a very low tech way. I like the idea of random effects and the fireing process creating the results while not affecting the surface quality and form.

Richard Hirsch

Richard Hirsch

John Wheeldon